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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 249 (some duplicates have been removed)
will stick with activist rafif jouejati. the justice department goes to blocks the texas' voter id law. >> according to the state of texas' own analysis, anywhere from 600,000 to nearly 800,000 registered voters did not have the required id and those were disproportionately hispanic. >> we will speak with nation reporter ari berman about the texas' voter id law and such laws around the country, and with the naacp attorney robert havingor the group as havinis its annual meeting in houston. a >> there should be no sympathy for goldman sachs. we should be doing everything to try to bring this matter forward. >> what is the matter? oakland city council votes to end its contract with goldman sachs that locked into a financial deal that cost the city millions. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. a record-setting heat wave in the eastern u.s. is starting to ease after two weeks of scorching temperatures. the heat wave has been blamed for causing at least 74 deaths from the midwest to the east coast, including 1
and p.e. (laughter) now, happily... (laughter) there is one bright spot in education-- texas. the large hadron collider of denying science. (laughter) now, folks, i have long praised the texas board of education for their valiant work rewriting our nation's history textbooks. but now... (laughter) i believe they've got some stiff competition from the texas g.o.p. who recently put a plank in their 2012 party platform regarding children's education that says-- and i quote-- we oppose the teaching of critical thinking skills. (laughter) amen, brother. for too long we have blindly accepted the idea of not blindly accepting ideas you know who i blame? i blame galileo. what a jagoff. (laughter) i mean, for centuries we had a perfectly good explanation for the order of the universe. bible says the sun goes around the earth making us the center of the universe you know what? everyone was happy! for them numb nuts over here get the telescope for christmas, using his precious critical thinking skills and suddenly the earth goes around the sun, blah blah blah, now we have lesbians. (laughter) but
states have passed restrictive voter id laws and several others have tried. in texas, who is voter id law was challenged by the justice department in court today, texas classifies its law as an emergency legislation so that they can rush it through before the election. in texas, a gun permit is a valid voter id. but a university-issued identification is not. hum, wonder who that benefits. the republican argument is that well, everybody has a driver's license or you should have to showed an id to cash a check. why wouldn't you require one to vote? now, that wouldn't be so bad if the list of valid ids weren't so limited in so many of these states. as an example, many investigatorserly people or those who live in cities, people of all economic classes don't have driver's licenses. birth certificates. well 48% of women, those who change their name for marriage don't have a birth certificate with their current lem name in most states, you have to call for a copy of your birth certificate voting rights act declared paying to vote is unconstitutional. some sta
. in the sixth at texas, he hammered a two-run left-handed blast to right field. in the same inning batting righty, he launched one to deep center for a grand slam. how do you do that? morales is only the third hitter in major league history to homer from both sides of the plate in the same inning. the angels beat the rangers 15-8. >>> to minneapolis now, in the fifth, the twins' denard span made a leaping catch at the wall to rob alex rios of a home run. and jamey carroll, the sac fly to left and alexi casilla beat the throw at the plate. final there twins 7-6. >>> in cincinnati, the reds started off hot against the padres, jumping in front 3-0. in the fifth, a double to the wall drove in three runs. the padres rolled past cincinnati 11-5, snapping the reds' ten-game win streak. >>> this has got to hurt. in seattle, the mariners' jesus montero nailed the second-base umpire right in the side. oh! he tried to get out of the way. took a while, but he finally got back on his feet. he's doing just fine. mariners, by the way, beat the blue jays 4-1. >>> at the cubs game in chicago, a very shaky
come states like california, texas, where hispanics make up over 30 prisoner of the undergraduate students. they also benefit places like the greatest percentage of the hispanic populations. young farmers in states like virginia demint florida, new york, texas, colorado and in mexico and arizona, nevada, virginia, north carolina, georgia will see a portion benefits from the newly authorized educational program. i may have left out some of the states but texas is in there and hopefully i mentioned that as well. we know the population in america is aging according to 70% of all farmers over the age of 55. by investing in young people that already know the agriculture and giving them the skills and education they need we can help build our next generation of farmers in america i would urge my colleagues to support this amendment and invest in the future of the agricultural here in america. i yield back. >> he yields back. i would simply no to that i believe the gentleman is making great effort here. we may have a little perfecting work to do on the language of the gentleman has -- is
camp and go somewhere else. many of them would go to canada. but if you're a slave in texas, forget canada, go to mexico. so wherever there's free territory, slaves went and tried to build a life for themselves away from slavery. and i think one of the points i hope that came out in the lecture is that there's clearly a concept of what freedom means and they may not have written letters saying, you know, treatises about the nature of freedom and liberty, but you have to get at it by looking at their actions. [ applause ] >> thank you. >>> tomorrow on washington journal, reuters economics correspondent pedro da cost that discusses the latest job numbers. and senior reporter joan goldwasser talks about the dodd-frank act. and stephanie vance, author of "the influence game." starting at 7:45 eastern live on cspan. >> the life of a sailor included scrubbing the deck in the morning, climbing aloft, whatever the duties assigned, gun drill practice, but by the end of the day, you're ready for some rest. but you don't get a full eight hours of sleep. on a ship like the constitution, it's fo
slaves to abandon their owners. it occurred in the colonial period to spanish territory. one texas slave holder who, like his contemporaries, had lost hundreds of slaves to the free soil of mexico may have spoken for many slaves when he said the negro, he has got mexico in his head. the knowledge and awareness of free land dom mate the testimony and actions of former slaves. john henry hill called on those he left behind in virginia to follow his historical calling. come, poor distressed men and women come to canada where colored men are free. john clayton echoed these sentiments. a worker in a richmond tobacco factory, clayton escaped with two other slaves, hiding in a small space next to the boiler of a steamer bound for philadelphia. soon after he wrote still, you may rest assured that i feels myself a free man and do not feel as i did when i was in virginia. thanks be to god. i no master into canada but i am my own man. >>> 17-year-old rebecca hall left baltimore in august 1855. she told still, because she simply wanted to be free. to even the most call yule observant slave holder in
the justice department will challenge texas' proposed law that would require voters to show identification. last hour on "starting point" we heard from one texas lawmaker who scoffs at claims that minorities are being unfairly targeted. >> what we really want are people eligible to vote. we want them to get to the polls and register to vote. we don't want those who are dead. we want actual real ballots from real people and this law does that. >> joe johns joins us now. what's the core issue before the court today? >> reporter: this is a texas case and the question in court is about ensuring the integrity of the ballot versus making sure voting rights of minorities are protected. it will be determined by your party affiliation. republicans arguing for a long time now that voter fraud is a big problem. we've heard that argument and so something numerous states have enacted laws that require voters to present photo identification though some have been challenged. democrats say a lot of democratic voters especially segments of the african-american and hispanic populations tend to lack the kind
texas where she's living now. >> i know what i know and the truth will set you free. i was bound for 23 years, 6 months and however many days. and i'm free. >> currel has not commented. he has taken a leave of absence. he has coached hundreds of elite athletes. >> athletes and fans from around the globe are in london now. skurt is security is tight. cameron fired back at comments mitt romney made about possible security concerns. cameron says security is and has been the country's top priority. ze seven years of planning, building and waiting is about to be over. london's mayor said that they're ready to put on a great show. over in london covering the olympic games for us tonight, he takes us inside one of the first stops for team usa. it's called team processing. it's where all the ath lelet at get their uniforms. >> police have finally lifted the crime tape six days after the shooting at a movie theater. holmes' lawyers are getting the first look at his home as neighbors in the building are being allow today return. this new video shows a very different james holmes. he was recorded
my other journalism. it is also -- i shined a light on odessa, texas, in "friday night lights," and i shined a light on myself with the same standards. i feel if you are going to write -- if you want to call it a memoir, that is fine. it is a personal story. you have to be honest. i mean, honesty, i guess, is brutal. otherwise, what's the point? i have read memoirs and i have to tell you, i feel a lot of them are kind of jiggered here and jiggered there, and everything turns out happily in the end. i didn't want to do that, but i knew that some people would say, whoa, whoa, you are really going deep here, and he's a defenseless little boy. but i wanted to know how much he knew about himself, and i did want to tell him. tavis: when you shined that light on odessa, texas, there are things about itself -- that is to say, the town - >> yes. tavis: things that odessa had to face about itself that it might not have liked so much. >> yes, that is true. tavis: that is an understatement, of course. >> [laughs] i think that is true. tavis: when buzz shines the light on himself on friday or any
merrow reports on a texas school district's approach to its high school drop-out crisis: luring students back with college courses. >> what we're looking at doing is doing education in a different way, where the colleges come together with us and start working with these young people while they're still in high school. >> suarez: judy woodruff looks back at the major decisions in this high-impact supreme court term with historian michael beschloss and marcia coyle of the "national law journal." >> ifill: and on this most american of holidays, we turn to the men who signed the declaration of independence and what happened to them after they did. >> they were placed under house arrest. they had-- they were allowed to write letters home. they were visited by physicians. no one was ever tortured. that's something i have seen over the years and it is wrong. every time i see it, i shudder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing
. >> a warmer planet means we have a greater likelihood of being unlucky. the chances of texas seeing another drought. colorado seeing another epic year of wildfires. all of these things become far more likely. >> reporter: it is also getting hotter at sea. in 2011, the second smallest area of ice on record. and over the last century sea levels have risen by 10 inches. at this pace by 2050, parts of cities like miami and new or leans will be underwater. and forecasters say the is possible the heat wave we just had is just the first one of the summer. there its another mass of warm air out west ready to roll this way. rob and sunny. >> sobering news, thank you, scott. >>> the intense summer heat is taking a toll on fish from the midwest down to the south. thousand of trout, carp and other fish have died as the hot weather heats up ponds and lakes and fish hatcheries like this one in north carolina. hatchery workers are scrambling to keep the water code. there is not much they can do. when temperatures get this high. >> terrible. >> unbelievable. that map is telling, miami, new orleans, cities
to texas to see how they are coping this morning. ♪ hi. we're spreading the word about new honey bunches of oats fruit blends and their unique taste combinations. like peach/raspberry. with one flavor in the granola bunch and one on the flake. two flavors. in harmony. honey bunches of oats. ke your day hes better. ♪ . bill: saying good-bye to the oldest general store in the united states. it is called gray's. it is in little compton, rhode island. went into business in 1788. 224 years later it is closing. it has a new owner, aged 21, inheriting the story after his father died a month ago. the new owner, the son, says he wants to be a sports journalist and will sell the property. heather: that makes me sad. sad story. severe drought in the u.s., getting even worse. take a look at this. the federal government designating another 76 counties as drought disaster areas. that brings the total amount to 1400 counties across 31 states. the lack of rainfall taking a terrible toll on american farms with crops baking in the sun. casey staying gel is live in garland, texas. i imagine pools are pre
now" -- lack of sleep. that's what experts say caused a pilot's meltdown over texas mid flight. >>> why this raises new questions about flight crew fatigue and everyone's safety in the skies. it is wednesday, july 11th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good wednesday morning, i'm sunny hostin. paula faris is on assignment. >> and i'm rob nelson. good morning, everybody. and people are asking did a lack of sleep really make that pilot lose it in the middle of the flight? we all remember this story, he really did kind of have an episode. now saying it is sleep deprivation what led to it. >> it's possible. >> possible -- very interesting story. there is some doubt there as well. >>> also this morning, cities in crisis. coast to coast, the drastic steps in cities that have simply run out of money. talk about a sign of the times. entire cities declaring bankruptcy. shows you how tough it is out there for various parts of the country. east to west coast. >>> and coming up, face to face with a giant alligator. we hear from a teenager who survived an attack bu
of a bus crash in texas. and the fallouts of the driver. >>> mysterious death. the body of a billionaire found in her london home. what happened to her husband. >> symbolic vote. republicans once again seeking to repeal the president's healthcare plan. why it's being done now. eyewitness news at 4:00 continues with denise and vic after this. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> it is 4:30. 89 degrees and partly sunny. hello. thanks for staying with eyewitness news. i'm denise koch. and i'm vic carter. here's what people are talking about. >> breaking news. republicans make good on a pledge to repeal another vote on the healthcare overhaul. the house just voted to repeal the law, but the senate will not follow suit. >> on this vote, the yeas are 244, the nays are 185, the bill is passed. >> reporter: this is the 33rd time, the republican-controlled house has voted to scrap all or part of president obama's healthcare reform law. >> this is a law, madam speaker, that the american people did not want when it was passed. and it remains a law that the american people do not want now. >> reporter: republic
like we know that texas will vote for romney. we can tell how about 40 or 41 of the states are going to go right now. but it's the rest. we call them swing states. those are the ones where the real action occurs. so they scoop up all the money here and spend it in places like nevada, colorado, ohio, pennsylvania, virginia, north carolina and of course florida. in those states, you are seeing ads nonstop on the network televisions every day and night, like crazy. >> larry, this election has such a different tone, such a different tenor and feeling than the last one, the public more restless, it has to do with the economy and ambivalence on the people's part? >> a little bit of everything, the sluggish economy has left millions of americans without work or working for less than they were a few years ago, the average net worth of americans has declined by 40%, to where we were in the 1990s, many are just plain desperate to find the candidate who will make things better for them now. >> we're in the homestretch now, just a few months to go, how do the candidates make that decisive decisi
and strength in the lord. we bring in ed young, a pastor in grapevine, texas and joins us via skype. the question all of us have been asking is -- how do we make sense of this? >> you can't make sense of it. the bible is very clear. it tells us we live in a fallen world and bad things happen to good people and innocent people. and this whole question of pain is one of the most difficult things to grapple with. however, i think we need to move rapidly from the why question to the what question, not just why me, not just why did this happen? but what should we do because of this? >> eric: recently, you were warning about the dangers of the internet, saying people being online all the time, impacts personal relationships. we have reports that the suspect spent all of his time alone in his apartment, online and maybe role-playing, adult-type web sites. what are your concerns about the culture? what is happening to our culture isn't internet and the ethics of all of this? >> i think social media is great. but there is a definite dark side to it. i think we need to be very, very careful w
line, i guess, you have texas with governor perry there saying that his state is going to opt out of medicaid even to the extent it's going to cost them money, put them at odds federally, put them at odds with the federal government, potentially, in legal breach of what their responsibilities are. do you think we're entering into a position where the red states and blue states are going to diverge fundamentally on what it's like to live there. whether or not you have health care based on whether or not your governor is a republican or democrat. >> vermont is different than texas, so there's a decision, and the decision in vermont, when we embraced the effort, that was bipartisan. why wewere able to move ahead is a lot of the republicans were arguing, we have to get the cost down. democrats traditionally argue we have to have insurance for everyone. the only way we're going to have sustainable access for all americans is to have lower cost health care and we do that by having belter delivery, best practices, things that improve the delivery of the health care system. so that's the
. he is completing a book for texas a & m university press. he also combined the traditional role of the am becomic historian and documenting and preserving the african-american experience. please join me in welcoming dr. delaney. >> last but not least is elaine nichols. she is the senior cure rater at the smithsonian institute. she is helping to develop an inaugural exhibition that will be included on the culture floor when the museum opens in 2015. it will focus on a dornment relir religion and performing arts. elaine has an ma degree in public service archeology and an ma in social administration and planning from case western university. please join me in welcoming miss nichols. [ applause ] so we have a wonderful panel and i'm excited to turn it over. go ahead. >> thank you. michael i'm so glad to be here. this evening with my distinguished colleagues and this very auspicious occasion. during the civil war and after the safl war, civil war he was a war hero and would become a political leader with national influence. his life was indeed the stuff of legend. the stories stoled
obama doubled down last night in texas. >> i believe in entrepreneur ship and i believe the market is the greatest system on earth to create wealth and prosperity. but just like abraham lincoln said there's some things we do better together than on our own. >> as president obama say those who start businesses succeed because of individual initiative drive hard work and creativity. there are critical actions that we must take to encourage new ones. that means we need the best infrastructure education system and affordable domestic sources of clean energy. the rnc is making fun of the president's comments now with photos like this one laughing and telling the wright brothers they didn't build their plane. mitt romney is hammering away as well. >> the idea to say that steve jobs didn't build apple, that henry ford didn't build ford motor tors, that papa john didn't build papa john pizza, that ray crock didn't build mcdonald that bill gates didn't build microsoft. you go down the list. that joe and his colleagues didn't build this enter prides. to say something like this is not only fo
in texas. why they are not letting old glory fly on veterans graves. that is our get real. ryan lizza's play list, flaming lips. "it's summertime." homicide of young people in america has an impact on all of us. how can we save these young people's lives? as a police chief, i have an opportunity to affect what happens in a major city. if you want to make a difference, you have to have the right education. university of phoenix opened the door. my name is james craig, i am committed to making a difference, and i am a phoenix. visit phoenix.edu to find the program that's right for you. enroll now. male spirit present.trong it's the priceline negotiator. >>what? >>sorry. he wants you to know about priceline's new express deals. it's a faster way to get a great hotel deal without bidding. pick one with a pool, a gym, a great guest rating. >>and save big. >>thanks negotiator. wherever you are. ya, no. he's over here. >>in the refrigerator? [ male announcer ] we believe small things can make a big difference. like how a little oil from here can be such a big thing in an old friend's life. p
and re-elected in the, for texas in congress in 2002. once the republicans gain control of the state legislature in texas, they then redrew the lines. you can see many of these districts going all the way from mexico to the austin metro area. and as a result of these -- this districting plan you can see all the other funny shapes up here and here. this is houston. and i think dallas. that as result of this redistricting plan, something like four or five democrats lost their seats. and were replaced by republicans. as it turned out, we'll talk about this when we do the voting rights act. the supreme court struck down this district as violating section 2 of the voting rights act because it diluted the hispanic vote, but when it came to the aggressive use of partisanship in the drawing of lines, the court didn't find it to be unconstitutional. even if it was done in the middle of a decade. one sort of story or lessen to be learned from both cases is that the -- while, there are partisan gerrymandering claims in found favor with the court, partisan claims are often litigated through othe
. that is up from our e-mail. dallas, texas, on our line for democrats -- caller: good morning. i am totally upset with congress. why are they on recess again? they will not do their jobs and if they knew sequestration was coming up but they don't want to act because they don't want tthe defense budget to be cut. host: is your message to them? what should they do? caller: they should do their job. if you pass a law, go through with it. let it go through. don't change your mind at the last minute because of special interests that are being paid. that is the bottom line. that is the problem. congress is being influenced by all the money and the supreme court made that clear. host: the lead story in this morning's "the washington times" - back to the phones, our discussion on your message to congress on sequestration, for royal, va., on our line for republicans. are you there? to right, let's move on philadelphia -- caller: how are you? what's your message to congress on sequestration? caller: my message is leaded k again. my message is democrats in the senate and house -- why aren't you workin
vote. they have a very strong case. in other states, their state voter i.d. laws such as texas and south carolina, those laws are being challenged by the justice department under the voting rights act. the voting right acts says you cannot pass laws that make it hard for minorities to vote. if you pass these laws, they have to get them approved in advance by the experts at the civil rights division. they said wait a minute there, is clear evidence that hundreds of thousands of latino and black voters, much more than the white community, would be affected. >> eliot: that's because they're covered by the voter rights act from prior history. >> under section 5 which applied originally to the states that were oppressing minority voting rights in the 1960s. the state of texas governor rick perry said, oh, the answer is the voting right act is inconstitutional. we don't need it any more. it's hold history. but they would have a better argument if they do in the keep passing laws that would make it heart to vote. >> eliot: rick perry was going to include the justice department--michae
at a sanctuary in south africa to attack a texas graduate student. we're going to have the latest on that story. new images of one of the chimps involved thain attack. >>> then "today's" professionals are in the house. among the topics we're going to be talking about we already know airlines charge extra fees for baggage, meals, even extra leg room. how would you feel about paying a fee that would let you get off the plane faster when you arrive at the terminal? we'll talk about this and many other topics. >>> let's begin the half hour with attempted murder trial of a florida teenager accused of viciously attacking a younger girl. prosecutors say it was all because of text messages. nbc's kerry sanders in fort lauderdale this morning. kerry, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, matt. wayne traceacy confessed he putn steele toed boots and tracked down ratley and attacked her, an attack so vicious it left her with brain damage. his lawyers claim he's not guilty because he was in sane. wayne treacy sat in court crying as prosecutors say he continued to kick the victim's head wearing steel toed
. >>> now, to texas, where a middle school principal is accused of using her daughter to plant a camera inside a girl's locker room. abc's ryan owens has that story for us. >> reporter: a hidden camera planted in the girls' locker room at this texas high school. and set to record during halftime at a basketball game. prosecutors allege, wendy long, a mom, principal and former school board member, did it not to see anyone changing. but to capture how her daughter's new coach talked to the team because her girls campaigned he yelled too much. >> the intent was to invade the other person's privacy. >> reporter: what's more, prosecutors claim she had her 17-year-old daughter sneak the camera into the locker room and hide it. the grand jury did not indict her daughter. and the authorities say the cameras didn't record anything inappropriate. still, long was arrested and if convicted could face a $25,000 fine or even 20 years in prison. her attorney tells abc news, she is surprised and disappointed by the charges. and maintains, no laws were broken. that's not how this mom sees it. her daught
in class fuel economy. it's our most innovative altima ever. ♪ pf. >> a three-judge panel is deciding texas's voter i.d. law. texas has sued the justice department for blocking its new law that, like similar measures in indiana and georgia, would require government-issued photo i.d.s at the polls. opponents of the law say they disproportionately affect black and hispanic voters and violate the landmark 1965 voting rights act. >>> omar van honey has been covering the voter i.d. laws, thanks for join being us. >> thanks for having me. >> take a look at your latest article, it looks at the impacts of the voter i.d. laws on the presidential election. how big of an issue is this for president obama's campaign? >> they're taking it very seriously. on the campaign already subtly and overtly they're going and telling people in these really main-based groups that you talked about, african-americans, hispanics but also young voters disproportionately affected by this, they need to turn out, african-americans at even a better rate than they had in 2008, and there's concerns that these voter i.d. laws
with us, folks. thanks for watching. mitt romney spoke to the naacp convention in houston, texas today. he delivered a speech short on specifics and long on tepid generalities. >> some may wonder why a republican would campaign in the african-american community and address the naacp. i hope to address every american of every race, creed, and sexual orientation. from the poorest to the richest and everyone in between. >> romney was greeted with polite applause throughout the speech, and even got some encouraging organ music. >> i can't promise you that i'll agree on every issue, but i do promise that your hospitality to me today will be returned. we will know one another. and we will work to common purpose. >> the audience gave romney their attention and a fair hearing. at the end of the speech, the crowd respectfully offered a standing ovation to the candidate. the attendees gave him some credit for showing up. unlike the previous president, george w. bush, who openly shunned any invitations to the naacp convention. but there was one moment where mitt romney delivered an actual policy posi
the locals are still going to call it banker smith, texas. >> mmm, mcdonald's. very well said, by the way. call it what you will. but in hearts of those in the >>> "outfront" next, playing chicken with the fiscal cliff. today, the senate hit the gas and headed towards the edge. >>> and u.s. and russia at odds over whether officials have the right to confront some americans in their own homes. >>> new details are coming about the young man who police say shot and killed 12 people inside a colorado movie theater. >>> plus, one of the victims who was shot three times has just been released from the hospital and he's "outfront" tonight. >>> i'm john avlon in for erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, playing chicken with the fiscal cliff. today the senate appeared to take action on extending the bush era tax cuts. appeared being the keyword. senator majority leader mitch mcconnell announced he would not filibuster the measure. instead he allowed a straight up-or-down majority wins vote. the republican plan, extend the tax cuts for everyone. and president obama's plan, extend the cuts f
from texas, the republican conference chairman, mr. hensarling. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for three minutes. mr. hensarling: i thank the gentleman for yielding. madam speaker, my democratic colleagues come to the floor and question, why are we here to vote to repeal the president's health care program? let me offer a few reasons. number one, the american people don't want it. the longer people have to know this bill, the more interested they are in seeing it repealed. reason number two, we hear from our friends on the other side of the aisle, well, the supreme court said it was constitutional. well, the $5 trillion of additional debt that they and president obama have foisted on the american people, it's constitutional, but, madam speaker, it is not wise. seniors know that the president's health care program cut half a trillion dollars out of medicare. a half a trillion dollars. the independent payment advisory board, one of 159 boards, commissions, programs to get between americans and their doctors, the independent payment advisory board, there t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 249 (some duplicates have been removed)